Have You Heard About Lilla Rose??

Are you tired of your plastic claw clip? Lilla Rose offers a wide variety of beautiful, comfortable, durable hair accessories. There is something for every age, style and hair length imaginable! Who wants to simplify their (or their daughter’s!) morning hair routine with unique accessories that LAST and WORK? I’m looking forward to being your personal “stylist”, and will be available to answer all of your questions! There will be video demos, easy hair tutorials, helpful product info, personalized style tips, hair chat, prizes, shopping and more!

You can browse available products and order ANY time at my party link: https://www.lillarose.biz/parties/22178

And don’t forget, Lilla Rose make wonderful gifts! All Lilla Rose accessories are between $5-$30 and come with a 1 year guarantee (even on bobby pins!)

Do I own a flexi clip?  You bet I do!  This one is mine:

my Lila Rose clip edit

They have many more beautiful ones to choose from too like:

Collage

With these, you can create such beautiful hairstyles no matter the texture nor thickness of your hair:

 

But what is this flexi clip, you ask?

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Size is this way:

Flexi sizing

 

Are you ready to order one?  My party runs NOW through 03 June 2017.  You can order here.  Shipping is always a flat rate of $2.95!

Thanks!  It would be nice to see some of my reader’s ordering.  I’d love to see them sporting flexi clips 🙂

 

Till Next Time,

Heather

Staff Sergeant Reckless

As Memorial Day weekend approaches, we like to spend time honoring all of those who have served in the military – humans and horses alike!!! Perhaps best known is Staff Sergeant Reckless (c. 1948 – May 13, 1968), a decorated war horse who held official rank in the United States military was a Mongolian-bred mare who was purchased in October 1952 for $250 from a Korean stable boy at the Seoul race park who needed money to buy an artificial leg for his sister. Reckless was bought by members of the Marine Corp and trained to be a pack horse for the Recoilless Rifle Platoon, Anti-Tank Company. She quickly became part of the unit and was allowed to roam freely through camp, entering the Marines’ tents, where she would sleep on cold nights, and was known for her willingness to eat nearly anything, including scrambled eggs, beer, Coca Cola and, once, about $30 worth of poker chips!

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Visiting Presque Isle State Park

Last weekend, my best friend and her family invited me to go with her and her family to the beautiful Presque Isle State Park in Erie, PA.  We saw so much more wildlife than I’ve ever seen at our local state park, or even around here.  I fell in love with water and the sand and saw driftwood for the first time.  This was also my first time to a “seashore” though I still dream of visiting the ocean one day.  I love those houseboat homes floating on Horseshoe Pond too!  I’d love to stay in one.  It was a beautiful and fun day and we finished up with a hearty meal at the Cracker Barrel in Erie.

Presque Isle State Park is a 3,200-acre sandy peninsula that arches into Lake Erie. As Pennsylvania’s only “seashore,” Presque Isle offers its visitors a beautiful coastline and many recreational activities, including swimming, boating, fishing, hiking, bicycling and in-line skating. A National Natural Landmark, Presque Isle is a favorite spot for migrating birds. Because of the many unique habitats, Presque Isle contains a greater number of the state’s endangered, threatened and rare species than any other area of comparable size in Pennsylvania.

At the City of Erie, a peninsula, over six miles in length, arches out into the water of Lake Erie forming an expansive natural harbor. French explorers recognized the intrinsic value of the harbor and in 1753 constructed Fort Presque Isle on the mainland near the harbor entrance. The name Presque Isle means “almost an island” in French and referred to the nearby peninsula. From Fort Presque Isle, fur traders could portage their goods fifteen miles to Fort Le Boeuf, located at the upper reaches of the Allegheny River near present-day Waterford, and then float downstream to Pittsburgh and on to Louisiana. Fort Presque Isle and its portage thus became a vital link between the French fur trade network in the Great Lakes and its colony on the Gulf Coast.

Curious about those houseboat homes floating on Horseshoe Pond?  I was too.  Learn more about them HERE.

If you live nearby or if you’re going to be traveling in the area, I highly recommend stopping in at this beautiful park.  You won’t be disappointed!

 

Till Next Time…

Heather

This past month has been too busy!  I’ve been babysitting, cleaning, gardening, getting over being sick. OY!

Hoping the rest of May will slow down and easy slowly into a pleasant summer.  I’ve been working on my newest fairy garden…

I won the garden hose, two mushrooms, the river rocks in front of the house, and the pink flower from Teelie Turner’s Fairy Garden.  She has the most awesome and adorable fairy garden accessories that I’ve laid eyes upon!

I made the arbor myself.  I just need to finish it.

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Your Inspiration For Thursday 20 April 2017

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We can’t live ethically without caring about ourselves as well as others.

—Winton Higgins

tatterdemalion-adjective

1 : ragged or disreputable in appearance

2 : being in a decayed state or condition : dilapidated

The exact origin of tatterdemalion is uncertain, but it’s probably connected to either the noun tatter (“a torn scrap or shred”) or the adjective tattered (“ragged” or “wearing ragged clothes”). We do know that tatterdemalion has been used in print since the 1600s. In its first documented use, it was a noun referring to a person in ragged clothing—the type of person we might also call a ragamuffin. (Ragamuffin, incidentally, predates tatterdemalion in this sense. Like tatterdemalion, it may have been formed by combining a known word, rag, with a fanciful ending.) Soon after the first appearance of tatterdemalion, it came to be used as an adjective to describe anything or anyone ragged or disreputable.

“ThreadBanger features episodes about making clothes and other D.I.Y. endeavors that will make you wish you could live life all over again and be a tatterdemalion steampunk kid from San Francisco.”
Virginia Hefferman, The New York Times, 21 June 2009

“Layoffs in the refinery, paper mills and brewery that anchored the economy after its shipbuilding and merchant trading days ended have left many striking 19th century buildings of the compact, hilly downtown in a tatterdemalion state but have not torn its welcoming, small-town atmosphere.”
Philip Hersh, The Chicago Tribune, 21 Nov. 2014

There is nobility in the struggle, you don’t have to win.
Sharon Pollock

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If you work really hard, and you’re kind, amazing things will happen.
Conan O’Brien

Inspiration for the Day: Today, notice when something is difficult and try not to avoid it.

If you are encouraged or informed by something you have read here at Ramblings Of A Plain Girl, please consider liking my page on Facebook or simply by leaving a comment below.

xo-heather